archaeology

The Book Adventures Weekly, Issue 45

A skeleton was recently found under a tree, after a storm blew the tree over. I can’t wait to read more about this archaeological find.

I loved Star Wars: The Force Awakens. Sure, it repeated all the plot elements and tropes of the earlier movies (father-son opposition, hidden Luke Skywalker, future Jedi knight living a hard existence on a desert planet who discovers the Force on a mission to save the republic, giant metal orb that destroys planets…). The young hero, a woman called Rey, was the best hero I’ve seen in theaters in ages. No adjustments were made to her character or the plot because of her sex. She didn’t have to be rescued; she rescued others. She could have been a man, except she was a woman. A fierce, independent, compassionate, strong, determined, hero.

Anyway, Vanity Fair interviewed J.J. Abrams about the movie.

A few weeks ago, I posted about ways to read DRM-Free. One way I didn’t really talk about? Reading public domain works. That is, reading books that are no longer covered by copyright, and are freely available to the public.

The Public Domain Review lists all the authors that will entered the public domain on January 1st.

The Victorian serial novel returns, mashed up with app technology. They’re calling it “appointment reading.”

Book Riot has created a new Read Harder challenge for 2016.

In the art world, an expert discovered the real-life location of Vermeer’s painting “The Little Street.”

And for a little bit of humor on this Monday morning after a long weekend, try to sympathize with this poor raccoon who accidentally dissolved their candy in a stream.

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Book Adventures Weekly, Issue 44

Good morrow, good book adventurers! The year end approaches. We hope you’re gathering your piles of to-reads and tallying up the books on your Goodreads challenge, in preparation for some time off and new beginnings.

The Book Smugglers are nearing the end of their Smugglivus celebrations. Today, Erika of Book Punks describes why she loved her favorite books of 2015, and looks forward to a few in 2016.

For all the ancient history lovers out there, Paul Weimer answers the question, Why Rome? (Also on Smugglivus)

In more on Rome, archaeologists just found human remains where Caesar defeated two Germanic tribes in modern the Netherlands.

The top 20 searches of the Europeana public database in 2015.

Tor.com links to novellas for $2.99, including The BuildersBintiThe Last Witness, and The Drowning Eyes.

I have no words for this story and these photos about Mongolian eagle hunters. Except maybe “beautiful.”

 

Classics: The Shadowy Horses

shadowyhorses The Shadowy Horses by Susanna Kearsley
Publisher: Jove
Date: March 1st 1999
Genre: Fiction / Paranormal
My rating: Outstanding adventure
This novel went way beyond my expectations, into “truly delightful” territory. I had expected something a little less fiction and a little more fluffy (Kind of like Elizabeth Lowell, who writes stories involving art history, book history, studies of artifacts, etc. – but whose writing is not nearly as good).

This novel has a perfect mix of history, romance, and mystery.

The plot begins immediately, with an archaeologist re-tracing her route on a bus after managing to sleep through her train stop. She’s received a teasing letter from an old flame about an amazing dig in southern Scotland, and is on her way to the Scottish borderlands to find out if she wants to work on it. The man financing and leading the dig has a reputation for being a bit mad, which she doesn’t find out until she meets him. It turns out he’s looking for the fabled Lost Legion, the Legio IX Hispana.

The author throws in a ghost – “The Sentinel” – and a psychic boy, which at first I thought I wouldn’t like. Fortunately, the supernatural stuff does not ruin the story or the characterization, both of which are compelling.

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